softness

Why does “doing exercise” work?


Bless all the physiotherapists in the world, they keep us doing exercises. And exercises are good because they get us doing the things we want to do in our daily lives. But how does it work?  This is not an exposition on exercise physiology – I’m not au fait enough with physiology to do that and there are many other people out there with vast amounts of knowledge giving us the benefit of their wisdom who have written at length about exercise and why it’s important. Instead I want to talk about some observations – and maybe pose some critical questions too.

For many years I’ve worked in a chronic pain management centre where people with chronic pain attend a three week intensive pain management programme. Staff members from outside the Pain Management Centre (we were located as an outpatient facility on the grounds of a rehabilitation hospital) always told us they could spot a person with pain the moment they saw them wandering from our building to the main cafeteria: people walking slowly, sometimes limping, but often just walking very slowly towards the cafe.

Over the course of the three weeks, this group of people would go from this slow amble to walking briskly and attending the hydrotherapy sessions, doing a daily exercise session (circuit-style); and in the final week of the programme, catching a bus to the shopping centre, purchasing food, coming back and preparing a shared barbecue for friends and family. What a turn-around!

Now, I said I wasn’t going to talk about physiology and I won’t, but I WILL point out that three weeks is not a long time. It’s so little time that it’s impossible for muscle length and strength to change significantly. And yet movements (measured using the six minute walking test and timed up and go) were quicker. Postures changed. People looked more alert and took more notice of the world around them. The question of how it is that this group of people could go from being recognisably “pain patients” to people who could do everyday activities has to be asked.

There are a couple of points to make before I do my thing. Firstly, while the people attending the programme were undeniably uncomfortable, clearly slow in their movements, and most definitely disabled, they weren’t, by usual measures “deconditioned”. In other words, they were of pretty average fitness – and indeed, many had been attending daily gym sessions at the behest of a case manager and under the supervision of a physiotherapist for months! At the same time they were not DOING much and felt extremely limited in their capabilities.

The second point is that although the programme had two “exercise” sessions each day, these were not high intensity sessions! The aim in most cases was to help people establish a baseline – or a reliable, consistent quota of exercise that they could do irrespective of their pain intensity. Most of the work within the exercise sessions was to help people become aware of their approach to activity, to modify this approach, and to then maintain it. Movement quality rather than quantity was the aim.

Here’s where I want to propose some of the mechanisms that might be involved.

  1. Humans like to, and almost need to, compare their performance with other people. It’s not something we choose to do, it’s an innate social bonding mechanism and whether we then modify what we do to match others – or deliberately try to do the opposite to mark out our own stance – we’ve based our behaviour on having observed what’s “normal” around us. And this applies even when people develop disability (Dunn, 2010), but perhaps more importantly, may well be fundamental to how we experience our world – and ourselves (Santiago Delefosse, 2011). When a group of people meet, their behaviour rapidly becomes more similar – similar gestures, similar body positions, and similar facial expressions. I wonder if one of the mechanisms involved in change within a group of people who live with chronic pain is this tendency to mirror one another’s behaviour.
  2. Having proposed that mirroring is one mechanism of change, why don’t groups of people with chronic pain ALL remain slowed and showing pain behaviour? Well, another mechanism involved in behaviour change is operant conditioning. When a group is performing exercise under the supervision of a “wise and caring authority” (ie a physiotherapist), many reinforcements are present. There’s the “no, that’s not quite the right movement” response, and the “oh you did it!” response. The “you can do it, just push a bit more” response, and the “if you can do that, how about another?” At the same time people are set quota or “the number of repetitions” to complete within a timeframe. Simply recording what is happening is sufficient to change behaviour – just ask someone who is on a diet to record their food intake for a week and you’ll likely see some changes! But add to this a very potent response from the wise and caring physiotherapist, and you’ll get warm fuzzies for doing more, and possibly cold pricklies if you don’t try.
  3. And finally, and possibly the most powerful of all, is the process of confronting feared movements – and doing them. Doing them without “safety behaviour” and doing them to specifically confront the thing that makes them scary. And doing them in many, many different settings, so as to alter the tendency to avoid them because they’re scary. A recently published systematic review and meta-analysis of graded activity (usually based on operant conditioning principles, and perhaps on cardiovascular fitness training principles) compared with graded exposure (deliberately confronting feared and avoided movements in a whole range of different contexts) found that graded exposure more effectively reduces catastrophising than just doing graded activation. This shouldn’t surprise us – one of the mechanisms involved in disability associated with nonspecific low back pain is avoiding doing things because people are fearful either of further injury, or of being unable to handle the effects of pain.

Where am I going with this post? Well, despite the face validity of exercise for reducing pain and disability, it’s not the physiological effects that first produce results. It can’t be because tissues do not adapt that quickly. What does appear to happen are a range of social-psychological processes that influence whether a person will (or won’t) do something. What this means is two things:

  • Physiotherapists, and indeed anyone who helps people do movements to reduce disability, really need to know their psychological processes because they’re inherent in the work done.
  • Becoming expert at analysing what a person wants and needs to do, and in being able to analyse then carefully titrate exposure to the contexts in which things need to be done is vital. That’s fundamental to occupational therapy theory, training and expertise.

 

 

Dunn, D. S. (2010). The social psychology of disability. In R. G. Frank, M. Rosenthal, & B. Caplan (Eds.), Handbook of rehabilitation psychology, (2 ed., pp. 379-390). Washington , DC: American Psychological Association

Lopez-de-Uralde-Villanueva, I., Munoz-Garcia, D., Gil-Martinez, A., Pardo-Montero, J., Munoz-Plata, R., Angulo-Diaz-Parreno, S., . . . La Touche, R. (2015). A systematic review and meta-analysis on the effectiveness of graded activity and graded exposure for chronic nonspecific low back pain. Pain Med. doi:10.1111/pme.12882

Santiago Delefosse, M. (2011). An embodied-socio-psychological perspective in health psychology? Social and Personality Psychology Compass, 5(5), 220-230.

Shebadog

Self-managing chronic pain


I have long been a proponent of helping people who live with pain to take control of their situation and actively self-manage as much as possible. My rationale has been that people who feel they are in control of some parts of their life are more likely to feel confident when their pain flares up, or when they have a life set-back. Today I took a second look at some of the papers on self-management published over the past few years, and I think it’s time to be a little critical.

The first issue to deal with is defining self-management. To me, self-management means knowing as much as possible about the health condition (whatever it is), knowing as much as possible about various treatments, working hard to learn and integrate ways of coping so that I (because yes, self-management is something I use for my fibromyalgia) can do the things I most value. By doing this, I can be more like who I want to be, rather than being defined by my pain, or what other people expect from me. But, self-management isn’t nearly as clearly defined as this in many people’s minds.

Here’s one definition “We defined self-management as the strategies individuals undertake to promote health (e.g., healthy living, exercising), manage an illness (e.g., manage symptoms, medication, and lifestyle changes), and manage life with an illness (e.g., adapt leisure activities or deal with losses caused by illness)” (Audulv, Asplund & Norbergh, 2012). Morden, Jinks and Ong (2011) found from a study of individual’s perceptions that managing chronic conditions is not solely related to medical recommendations and that self-management is central to maintaining a sense of ‘normality’ in everyday life or to reasserting one’s position in the social world when living with a chronic illness and demonstrating competency from a moral perspective.

Interestingly, a definition from COPD management describes self -management as “… programmes that aim to teach the skills needed to carry out medical regimens specific to a long-term disease and to guide behaviour change to help patients control their own condition and improve their well-being”(Effing,  Bourbeau, Vercoulen, Apter, Coultas, Meek, et al.2012). The distinction between chronic pain self-management and other chronic illness self-management lies in the need to address broader “living” issues rather than just learning to “carry out medical regimens”. And that is both the problem and the distinction between chronic pain self-management and other chronic disease self-management approaches.

Let me unpack this: For people living with COPD, or diabetes, there are critical medical management practices that need to be learned and integrated into daily life so that the underlying medical condition doesn’t get worse and lead either to complications, or even early death. The focus on self-management in these situations seems to be on the medical tasks that must be undertaken. The end results are often measured in terms of reducing the number of extreme events – like having hyperglycaemia, or being admitted with a chest infection and needing oxygen.

Now if I turn to the qualitative literature on self-management in chronic pain, what is very obvious is that self-management isn’t about the medical procedures that must be followed. It’s far more about living life – and integrating ways of getting to do what’s important without too many flare-ups that get in the way of doing these things. In fact, Morden, Jinks & Ong (2011) found that in people living with knee osteoarthritis, self-management wasn’t something people identified with – what might have been classified by clinical people as “exercise” or losing weight or keeping active weren’t thought of as “self-management” by people living with knee OA. They thought this was “just getting on with it”. I particularly liked one comment : “because people perceived their activities to be an integral part of their daily routine they were not surfaced as deliberate action.” In other words, when people focus on living life, coping strategies become habits and routines that are secondary to the doing of life.

Mike Nicholas and colleagues have looked into coping and self-management extensively as part of ongoing research associated with the Royal North Shore Pain Management Programme. they were interested in whether it’s possible to find out if adhering to strategies introduced within a programme was predictive of outcome: in other words, did people who strongly adhered to what they learned during a programme ultimately gain better quality of life, lower pain, less disability and feel better? Surprisingly, they did – I say surprisingly because in a couple of meta-analyses (for example Kroon, an der Burg, Buchbinder, Osborne, Johnston & Pitt, 2014; Oliveira, Ferreira, Maher, Pinto et al, 2012) self-management approaches made very little, if any, difference to pain and disability both over the short and long-term.

What does this mean? Well, quite apart from the blurry definitions of self-management, and the lack of standardisation inside self-management programmes, I think we need to ponder on just what we’re asking people to do – and how they (we) regard the strategies we hope people will develop. Cutting to the chase, in chronic pain management we risk people knowing “about” strategies, but failing to adopt them in daily life because we haven’t really thought about daily life and what this is to each individual. When I think about the vast number of changes to self-concept that chronic pain wreaks on people, I think it’s hard to be ready to adopt these new techniques until “who I am” is included in the mix. Maybe one reason for the modest improvements after self-management is that we’re not thinking about self-identity and values and that these need attending to so that using coping strategies is worthwhile. It’s yet another reason I think occupational therapists offer a great deal in chronic pain self-management – who are you? what do you want your life to stand for? what things do you do (or want to do) that makes your life yours? Finally, to paraphrase as my colleague Ben Darlow, living with low back pain (read: any chronic pain) means balancing the need to minimise pain fluctuations with the things that make life worth living. That’s what I call “flexibly persisting”.

Audulv, A., Asplund, K., & Norbergh, K.-G. (2012). The integration of chronic illness self-management. Qualitative Health Research, 22(3), 332-345. doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1049732311430497

Effing, T. W., Bourbeau, J., Vercoulen, J., Apter, A. J., Coultas, D., Meek, P., . . . van der Palen, J. (2012). Self-management programmes for copd moving forward. Chronic respiratory disease, 9(1), 27-35.

Morden, A., Jinks, C., & Bie Nio, O. (2011). Lay models of self-management: How do people manage knee osteoarthritis in context? Chronic Illness, 7(3), 185-200.

Nicholas, M., Asghari, A., Corbett, M., Smeets, R., Wood, B., Overton, S., . . . Beeston, L. (2012). Is adherence to pain self-management strategies associated with improved pain, depression and disability in those with disabling chronic pain? European Journal of Pain, 16(1), 93-104. doi:10.1016/j.ejpain.2011.06.005

Oliveira, V. C., Ferreira, P. H., Maher, C. G., Pinto, R. Z., Refshauge, K. M., & Ferreira, M. L. (2012). Effectiveness of self-management of low back pain: Systematic review with meta-analysis. Arthritis care & research, 64(11), 1739-1748.

cold sea

Pain measurement: Measuring an experience is like holding water


Measurement in pain is complicated. Firstly it’s an experience, so inherently subjective – how do we measure “taste”, for example? Or “joy”? Secondly, there’s so much riding on its measurement: how much pain relief a person gets, whether a treatment has been successful, whether a person is thought sick enough to be excused from working, whether a person even gets treatment at all…

And even more than these, given it’s so important and we have to use surrogate ways to measure the unmeasurable, we have the language of assessment. In physiotherapy practice, what the person says is called “subjective” while the measurements the clinician takes are called “objective” – as if, by them being conducted by a clinician and by using instruments, they’re not biased or “not influenced by personal feelings or opinions in considering and representing facts”. Subjective, in this instance, is defined by Merriam Webster as “ relating to the way a person experiences things in his or her own mind. : based on feelings or opinions rather than facts.”  Of course, we know that variability exists between clinicians even when carrying out seemingly “objective” tests of, for example, range of movement, muscle strength, or interpreting radiological images or even conducting a Timed Up and Go test (take a look here at a very good review of this common functional test – click)

In the latest issue of Pain, Professor Stephen Morley reflects on bias and reliability in pain ratings, reminding us that “measurement of psychological variables is an interaction between the individual, the test material, and the context in which the measure is taken” (Morley, 2016). While there are many ways formal testing can be standardised to reduce the amount of bias, it doesn’t completely remove the variability inherent in a measurement situation.

Morley was providing commentary on a study published in the same journal, a study in which participants were given training and prompts each day when they were asked to rate their pain. Actually, three groups were compared: a group without training, a group with training but no prompts, and a group with training and daily prompts (Smith, Amtmann, Askew, Gewandter et al, 2016). The hypothesis was that people given training would provide more consistent pain ratings than those who weren’t. But no, in another twist to the pain story, the results showed that during the first post-training week, participants with training were less reliable than those who simply gave a rating as usual.

Morley considers two possible explanations for this – the first relates to the whole notion of reliability. Reliability is about identifying how much of the variability is due to the test being a bit inaccurate, vs how much variability is due to the variability of the actual thing being measured, assuming that errors or variability are only random. So perhaps one problem is that pain intensity does vary a great deal from day-to-day.  The second reason is related to the way people make judgements about their own pain intensity. Smith and colleagues identify two main biases (bias = systematic errors) – scale anchoring effects (that by giving people a set word or concept to “anchor” their ratings, the tendency to wander off and report pain based only on emotion or setting or memory might be reduced), and that daily variations in context might also influence pain. Smith and colleagues believed that by providing anchors between least and “worst imaginable pain”, they’d be able to guide people to reflect on these same imagined experiences each day, that these imagined experiences would be pretty stable, and that people could compare what they were actually experiencing at the time with these imagined pain intensities.

But, and it’s a big but, how do people scale and remember pain? And as Morley asks, “What aspect of the imagined pain is reimagined and used as an anchor at the point of rating?” He points out that re-experiencing the somatosensory-intensity aspect of pain is rare (though people can remember the context in which they experienced that pain, and they can give a summative evaluative assessment such as “oh it was horrible”). Smith and colleagues’ study attempted to control for contextual effects by asking people to reflect only on intensity and duration, and only on pain intensity rather than other associated experiences such as fatigue or stress. This, it must be said, is pretty darned impossible, and Morley again points out that “peak-end” phenomenon (which means that our estimate of pain intensity depends a great deal on how long we think an experience might go on, disparities between what we expect and what we actually feel, and differences between each of us) will bias self-report.

Smith et al (2016) carefully review and discuss their findings, and I strongly encourage readers to read the entire paper themselves. This is important stuff – even though this was an approach designed to help improve pain intensity measurement within treatment trials, what it tells us is that our understanding of pain intensity measurement needs more work, and that some of our assumptions about measuring our pain experience using a simple numeric rating scale might be challenged. The study used people living with chronic pain, and their experiences may be different from those with acute pain (eg post-surgical pain). The training did appear to help people correctly rank their pain in terms of least pain, average pain, and worst pain daily ratings.

What can we learn from this study? I think it’s a good reminder to us to think about our assumptions about ANY kind of measurement in pain. Including what we observe, what we do when carrying out pain assessments, and the influences we don’t yet know about on pain intensity ratings.

Morley, S. (2016). Bias and reliability in pain ratings. Pain, 157(5), 993-994.

Smith, S. M., Amtmann, D., Askew, R. L., Gewandter, J. S., Hunsinger, M., Jensen, M. P., . . . Dworkin, R. H. (2016). Pain intensity rating training: Results from an exploratory study of the acttion protecct system. Pain, 157(5), 1056-1064.

look what's coming

What should we do about acute low back pain?


There’s no doubt that low back pain presents a major healthcare problem in all parts of the world. It’s probably the most common form of musculoskeletal pain around, it can be highly disabling – and its management is one of the most contentious imaginable. As someone once said “if there was an effective treatment for low back pain, there wouldn’t be such a range of treatments available!”

I want to take a step back and consider people living with nonspecific low back pain only, it’s by far the most prevalent, and while no-one would say there is a single diagnosis that can be applied to all forms of back pain, there seem to be some similarities in how this kind of pain responds.

What we’ve learned over the past year is that acetaminophen hardly touches the pain of nonspecific low back pain Machado, Maher, Ferreira, Pinheiro et al, 2015). This means anti-inflammatory medications (NSAIDs) are the most likely group of medications to be prescribed, or perhaps codeine. Exercise was the recommended treatment for osteoarthritis of the hip and knee, suggesting that this approach might also be recommended for low back pain.

Turning to exercise, it seems that there is no clear indication that any particular type of exercise is any better than any other exercise for low back pain (not even motor control exercise)(Saragiotto, Maher, Yamato Tie, Costa et al, 2016), and all exercise improves pain and disability – and even recurrences (Machado, Bostick & Maher, 2013). What seems important is that people get moving again, and do so quickly after the onset of their back pain.

Graded exposure has also been in the news, latest being a study using graded exposure for elderly people living with chronic low back pain, where it was found to not only improve function (reduce disability) but also found to reduce pain (Leonhardt, Kuss, Becker, Basler et al, in press). OK, pain reduction wasn’t reduced a great deal, but neither have many treatments – and at least this one has few adverse effects and improves disability.

Where am I going with this?

Well, recently I made some apparently radical suggestions: I said that

  1. sub-typing low back pain doesn’t yet seem to be consistent;
  2. that no particular exercise type seems better than anything else;
  3. that ongoing disability is predicted more by psychosocial factors than by physical findings – even when injection treatments are used (van Wijk, Geurts, Lousberg,Wynne, Hammink, et al, 2008).
  4. that people with low back pain seem to get better for a while, and often find their back pain returns or grumbles along without any particular provocation;
  5. and that perhaps treatment should focus LESS on reducing pain (which doesn’t seem to be very effective) and LESS on trying to identify particular types of exercise that will suit particular people and MORE simply on graded return to normal activity.
  6. Along with really good information about what we know about low back pain (which isn’t much in terms of mechanics or anatomy, but quite a lot about what’s harmful and what doesn’t help at all), maybe all we need to do is help people get back to their usual activities.

For my sins I was asked not to remain involved in the group planning health system pathways (I also suggested maybe osteopaths, chiropractors, massage therapists and both occupational therapists and psychologists might also be good to be involved – maybe that was the radical part because I can’t see an awful lot radical about my other suggestions!).

Here’s my suggestion – when one of the most difficult aspects of low back pain management is helping people return to normal activities within their own environment (work, home, leisure), why not call in the experts in this area? I’m talking about YOU, occupational therapists! So far I haven’t been able to find a randomised controlled trial of occupational therapy graded exposure for low back pain. I’m sorry about this – it’s possibly a reflection of the difficulty there is in even suggesting that DOING NOTHING (ie not attempting to change the tissues, just helping people return to normal activity) might be an active form of treatment, and one that could work.

I don’t want to denigrate the wonderful work many clinicians do in the field of low back pain, but I suspect much of what seems to work is “meaning response” – well-meaning clinicians who believe in their treatments, patients who believe in their therapists, treatments that appear plausible within the general zeitgeist of “why we have low back pain”, all leading to a ritual in which people feel helped and begin to do things again.

Many of us have read Ben Darlow’s paper on The Enduring Impact of What Clinicians Say to People with Low Back Pain (Darlow, Dowell, Baxter, Mathieson, Perry & Dean, 2013). We have yet to count the cost of well-meaning clinicians feeding misinformed and unhelpful beliefs (and behaviours) to people with acute low back pain. I think the cost will be extremely high.

I just wonder if we might not be able to cut out much of the palaver about low back pain if we went directly to the “feeling helped and begin to do things again” without the misinformation and cost of the rituals involved. While other clinicians can contribute – the process of doing in the context of daily life is where occupational therapy research, experience and models have focused for the discipline’s history. That’s the professional magic of occupational therapy.

 

Darlow, B., Dowell, A., Baxter, G. D., Mathieson, F., Perry, M., & Dean, S. (2013). The enduring impact of what clinicians say to people with low back pain. Annals of Family Medicine, 11(6), 527-534. doi:10.1370/afm.1518

Leonhardt C, Kuss K, Becker A, Basler HD, de Jong J, Flatau B, Laekeman M, Mattenklodt P, Schuler M, Vlaeyen J, Quint S.(in press). Graded Exposure for Chronic Low Back Pain in Older Adults: A Pilot Study. Journal of Geriatric Physical Therapy.

Macedo, L. G., Bostick, G. P., & Maher, C. G. (2013). Exercise for prevention of recurrences of nonspecific low back pain. Physical Therapy, 93(12), 1587-1591.

Machado, G. C., Maher, C. G., Ferreira, P. H., Pinheiro, M. B., Lin, C.-W. C., Day, R. O., . . . Ferreira, M. L. (2015). Efficacy and safety of paracetamol for spinal pain and osteoarthritis: Systematic review and meta-analysis of randomised placebo controlled trials (Vol. 350).

Saragiotto Bruno, T., Maher Christopher, G., Yamato Tiê, P., Costa Leonardo, O. P., Menezes Costa Luciola, C., Ostelo Raymond, W. J. G., & Macedo Luciana, G. (2016). Motor control exercise for chronic non-specific low-back pain. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, (1). http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/14651858.CD012004/abstract doi:10.1002/14651858.CD012004

van Wijk, R. M. A. W., Geurts, J. W. M., Lousberg, R., Wynne, H. J., Hammink, E., Knape, J. T. A., & Groen, G. J. (2008). Psychological predictors of substantial pain reduction after minimally invasive radiofrequency and injection treatments for chronic low back pain. Pain Medicine, 9(2), 212-221.

P1000573

Live Plan Be


There are times in my work when I feel like I’m banging my head against a brick wall. Even though I’ve been saying most of what I write about on here since forever, it seems to take SUCH a long time for anything much to change! BUT then along comes something totally cool to brush my frustration away, and today I want to talk about Live Plan Be developed by Pain BC in Vancouver, Canada.

A couple of years ago I was given the privilege of being asked to prepare a document analysing the content and approach of self management programmes. I reviewed the Cochrane systematic reviews which all supported a multidisciplinary self management approach as the foundation for chronic pain management. I then turned to the qualitative research to investigate what it’s like to be part of a programme from the participant’s perspective. I found that people attending these programmes enter a journey of self-discovery, that some of the skills don’t seem to make sense at first – but do when the person returns to their own setting. I also found that people living with chronic pain relish the opportunity to feel that their pain is acknowledged, that others on the programmes know what it’s like to live with chronic pain so they don’t have to spend ages trying to explain themselves, and to have the chance to be with others who ‘get it’ means breaking out of the isolation that chronic pain can bring.

I also took a look at the ways these programmes can be delivered. While many programmes are face-to-face, with technology making online programmes increasingly more responsive and flexible, I wanted to see whether there were major differences in the outcomes of each programme. Although it’s difficult to tell because the populations using both approaches are not exactly the same, from what I could find, the outcomes were comparable. This is really exciting because it means more people can get access to approaches that have solid research underpinning them without having to travel to and from, and without the staffing needed for face-to-face programmes.

As a result of my report, I suggested that Pain BC might like to investigate developing a whole new programme for helping people live well with chronic pain, and to make this an online programme with some of the features that the research into online behaviour change programmes has identified as useful. Things like having a discussion forum so participants can connect and share their experiences of the reality of living with chronic pain. Having action prompts so that people don’t just read something – but also get prompted to DO something with that information – and most importantly, have this tied to where the person is currently at in their journey towards making changes to live with their pain. I recommended having some self-assessments so people can track their progress, and a place where they could record the things that worked, and those that didn’t work, so it’s easy to share with other people including health professionals.

I’m SO excited to see how Live Plan Be has come together – and it’s now LIVE!

The team that has put this together has done an amazing job, exceeding my wildest dreams of what the programme might look like. It’s sophisticated, easy to use, has lovely graphics and video recordings of real people doing real things, has SO MUCH information on it – and it’s free! If you have chronic pain, or you work with people living with chronic pain, I would love you to take a look at it, and try it out. Then let me know what you think. Whatever feedback you give, you’ll know that the team will work hard to keep on making it better and more useful, so please let them know.

Meantime, I’m hoping that this will bring some hope to people who have struggled with chronic pain, and would like to learn to live well.

solo

Gone fishin’


Easter break – and I’ve gone fishin’

Back next week with more from Healthskills. Don’t forget that you can subscribe to my blog, you can send comments and ask questions, make topic requests and connect with me via Facebook (Bronnie Lennox Thompson), Twitter (@adiemusfree), Tumblr: Miss Miche’s Mother, and LinkedIn: Bronnie Lennox Thompson. Introduce yourself via my “About” page, and enjoy browsing the many posts I’ve put up over the last 8 years.

solo

sentinals at dawn

bridge to

Neuroplasticity: Transforming the brain


Neuroplasticity is a concept that’s taken the world by storm over the past years – take a look at this Google graph of the growth in searches for the term!Capture

 

The idea behind using the brain’s ongoing neuroplasticity is that we can influence the connections between neurones by doing and thinking differently. Great idea, and definitely one we can use. There have been many discussions about how much we can influence plasticity – or not (this post refers to education and neuroplasticity, this to an old discussion about Norman Doidge’s book – and some of the points that have been omitted). Whatever the real situation, there’s no doubt that our brains do continue developing, forming and reforming connections between synapses and generally responding to our world and the interactions we have with our world via our bodies.

Pain researchers have been particularly enraptured by the idea that the brain can develop new connections, driven it seems by a greater understanding that our experience of pain is an integration of information from the body, modulated at every step of the way by both ascending and descending influences, right until that information is processed by various parts of our brain and, in combination with past experience, expectations, beliefs, predictions for the future, current goals and priorities and in our sociocultural context, produces what we know as pain. Long, long sentence – but you know what I mean!

So, the reasoning seems to go, if pain is an output of our nociceptive system and produced via all these interactions, then neuroplasticity should mean painful experiences can be reversed using the same principles. And yes! Lo and behold! In some cases this happens – vis all the research produced by Moseley and crew in Adelaide, and promoted by the NOI group, and others.

While Lorimer’s group has produced probably the most consistent body of work in relation to therapy based on neuroplasticity, with NOI promoting many of these approaches, it’s not the only group to do so.  Today I’m taking a look at Michael Moskowitz and Marla Golden’ book Neuroplastic Transformation: Your brain on pain, and the accompanying website.

I’ve been asked to take a look at this by a follower, and it’s been an interesting and fun project to work on.

The book is a spiral bound, colour printed A4 sized book with large print (yay!) and gorgeous illustrations of brain sections and neurones and other beautiful diagrams relevant to understanding the brain. The principles underpinning the book are that if we can understand a bit more about the brain, we can harness the functions so we can train our brain to be a little more settled and out of pain. The three neuroplastic rules are: What is fired is wired; What you don’t use you lose; When you make them you break them; when you break them you make them.  The premise is that it’s possible to reverse the changes that occur when a person is experiencing persistent pain – “treathment that uses the basic principles of neuroplasticity to change the brain pathways back to normal function and anatomy”. The authors discuss using thoughts, images, sensations, memories, soothing emotions, movements and beliefs to modify the experience.

The process of treatment involves four phases: Rescue, Adjustment, Functionality and Transformation, or RAFT. Rescue involves generating hope that pain can be changed by providing information about neuroplasticity, and developing a partnership between clinician and person living with pain. Adjustment involves “stabilising” the pain disorder – using a multi-modal approach including medications, injections, and psychosocial treatments to increase activities while reducing pain – emphasising that adjusting to the pain disorder is not the end goal. Functionality involves the person, every time he or she experiences pain, challenging the experience with non-painful stimuli. In other words, every time the person becomes aware of his or her pain, they need to use thoughts, beliefs, images, sensations, movements and emotions to “reverse the neuroplastic processes that cause persistent pain”. Finally, Transformation involves using the experience of overcoming pain to establish new ways to give pleasure.

What I like about this approach is that it is explained and illustrated very well, using up-to-date information and illustrations. It strongly supports self-management or the person being as much part of the treatment as any clinician. That’s good – because, as any of us who have ever tried to change a habit know very well, change is hard! And that’s probably one of the three main concerns I have about employing this approach as a core pain treatment.

My concerns:

  1. Reversing or altering cortical pathways is truly difficult – and it’s perhaps not possible to completely reverse, especially if the problem has been present for a long time. Here’s why: can anyone remember learning to ride a bike? Remember all that falling off, the wobbling, the stopping and starting, the weaving all over the place? How many hours did it take to learn to do that successfully, smoothly and to the point where you were safe to ride in traffic? Now, for some of you, it will have been YEARS since you jumped on a bike. Do you forget how to ride? No. You might wobble a bit, but you don’t actually forget. Similarly, in phobic states, pathways associated with avoiding the feared stimulus remain “wired together” even when new pathways associated with approaching the stimulus are developed. What this means is that it’s possible for a spider phobic to remain somewhat jumpy around a spider even after treatment has reduced the screaming heebie-jeebies. When we think about pain and the myriad associations between the experience, context, interoception (internal body feeling-sense), memories, emotions, language, treatment visits, investigations – there are so many connections that become wired together as a result of experiencing persistent pain that to completely reverse it is an almighty monumental challenge requiring hours or dedicated practice.
  2. While the principles of a neuroplastic approach are well-known, there are some differences in the approach depicted in this book that I’m not aware of being tested formally in pain research. For example, while it’s nice to have a pleasant smell or memory brought to mind, I’m not aware of studies showing that doing this changes memory for pain (or pain intensity). I may well be wrong about this and I’d love someone even more geeky than me to bring some studies to my attention.
  3. My third reservation relates to the well-established research showing that persistent pain is not easily changed, and meanwhile, in the pursuit of pain reduction, many people lose out on good things in life. While people are sitting in waiting rooms, spending time with therapists, monitoring and checking on pain intensity, it becomes very difficult to carry on with valued actions. There are many ways to make space to have your pain and live as well. This doesn’t mean you need to give up hope of pain reduction, but it does mean the focus moves from this as a life focus and on to the things that make life of any kind worthwhile. Maybe the two approaches can go hand in hand, but to my mind the very intensive nature of the approach within this book means that attention must be shifted away from valued actions and towards doing the things that this book argues will reverse pain.

Overall I like the approach within this book – I like that it’s person-centred, positive, uses underlying principles and encourages the person to be actively involved in his or her treatment. There’s no way you can be a passive recipient with this approach! I would love to see some more in-depth study of the effects of this treatment, even in a series of single-subject experiments. I think it could be very helpful, but I’m a little concerned at the focus on pain reduction as the primary goal, and the time and energy this approach demands.

artisan village

San Diego Pain Summit 2016


I’ve delayed writing about the San Diego Pain Summit to allow my thoughts to settle and to come up with a suitable distillation of the event. Good things take time to brew!

Impressions of San Diego – city of warmth and light, food and water and the sea… A lovely place to visit, and one that I would almost be happy to live in. But the setting was the least attractive aspect of this most excellent gathering of pain peeps. For me, first time attendee, it was like a gathering of the best of friends all in one place with plenty of time to geek out on pain science – and to put faces to names that I’m so familiar with that I feel like we’ve been friends for ever!

First off, hat tip to Rajam Roose who single-handedly organised this event. Without her vision and organisational strengths I would have missed a highlight of my career so far! Rajam was the most personable hostess, making sure I was picked up from the airport, fed and then dropped off at the hotel, taking photos to share on Facebook as I JUST GOT OFF THE PLANE after at 19 hour flight from New Zealand. Seriously, Rajam and her wonderful man (and assorted friends both furry and not) made my arrival welcoming and wonderful.

And this is probably one of the nicest things from the whole San Diego meeting – feeling welcomed, at home, and amongst friends. And this despite my being the only occupational therapist at the meeting! Come on, occupational therapists, you really need to get your collective acts into gear! The Pain Summit is probably the only meeting I’ve been to where everyone, no matter what background, whether body-oriented, brain-oriented, disability or function-oriented – is accepted, encouraged and enriched. Occupational therapists would feel right at home.

And now, to review the meeting itself. Well, to be honest, the meeting WAS about the people. The discussions had between different professionals from differing backgrounds and theoretical orientations, all focused on learning more about pain and how to better help people who experience pain. While the speakers were outstanding, without the community discussions, both on and off-line, I think this meeting would be much like any other. The hallmark is that the people who attend are committed, passionate and really think about the meaning of new research and how they can apply it.

I’ve talked about a community of practice before. A community of practice is a group of people who have developed a commonality in how they tackle their work. Where theory and practice are connected in the most intimate ways. Where each piece of evidence is examined in the light of the question ALL research should be evaluated against: So what? So what does this mean for ME? So what can I use from this? So what does it mean that this – and this – are both true? So what questions do I need to ask myself?

The Pain Summit is a place where choices don’t have to be made. It’s designed so that people can attend every session, rather than having to choose a stream (and miss out on the other stream). And one where ethics hold out over money-making. Rajam doesn’t want to have to take sponsorship if this means the Summit has to compromise on any information presented. It’s designed so that clinicians can meet the presenters and talk. Where presenters engage with one another and with the attendees.

The most profound talks for me personally were Lehman’s take on biomechanics – when it applies, and when it doesn’t. Argued from a biomechanical perspective. And Benedetti’s talk on placebo and the mechanisms that skew randomised controlled trials of new pharmacological and surgical agents (yes, I know placebo is a thing affecting ALL treatments, but much more difficult to study in nonpharmacological approaches). I was saddened to hear that yes, if we persist in using the WHO Analgesic Ladder, we may be inadvertently doing harm because repeated ineffective treatments can establish negative expectancies from ALL treatments – hence my take on identifying the pain mechanisms involved and providing targeted therapy specific to those mechanisms rather than a “multimodal” approach that may not provide much at all. The argument Benedetti made was that medications that don’t work create a learning effect in the recipient, reducing the potential for subsequent treatments to be effective. So if you have fibromyalgia, probably the archetypal “central sensitisation” pain problem, treating it with NSAIDs and codeine and other opiates isn’t likely to do anything wonderful – why not begin with the tricyclic antidepressants and gapabentin/pregabalin first?

I also loved Alison Sim’s work on presenting CBT for pain, clear, precise – and engaging. And yes, anyone can integrate it into daily practice.  The appetite for “psychological” approaches amongst this largely hands-on audience was amazing. Kevin Vowles impressive presentation on the futility of many approaches to “get rid of pain” and the usefulness of values-based action (using ACT) (and his wonderful workshop on ACT) made my day. Between them and Sandy Hilton’s discussion of ways to work with people who have pelvic pain, and I began to feel like this group of clinicians really knows that PEOPLE experience pain, not limbs or body parts. And to help PEOPLE we need to BE people – human connectedness is so important.

There were many other talks, but these were the ones that really stood out for me. I’m now impatiently waiting for the video recordings so I can relive the moments of the Pain Summit and pick up on the many, many details of talks I haven’t mentioned. I haven’t mentioned them not because they weren’t great, but because the ones I’ve listed resonated particularly with me in my own orientation.

Next year – will you be there? I hope so – I’ll be there, and I’m looking forward to being amongst friends again – and keeping that discussion going on Facebook, Twitter, SomaSimple in between.

duck duck go

Pain exposure therapy – what is it?


Thanks to an enquiry on my About page, I’ve been prompted to read a little about pain exposure therapy. This is a little-known approach to helping people with CRPS type I (the type that is NOT associated with a peripheral nerve injury. Type II is the same phenomenon but IS associated with an injury to the nerve.)

Graded exposure is an approach commonly adopted to help those people who are afraid of, or phobic about, a “thing”. Most of us will know about spider phobia treatment where people are progressively encouraged to stay with feelings of anxiety and distress while being shown and eventually handling a spider. Graded exposure has also been used to help people who are fearful of experiencing painful flare-ups and therefore avoid doing things – it’s been a successful approach especially for people who report high levels of pain catastrophising (or, as I like to put it, “freaking out” at fluctuations in pain). I’ve reported on graded exposure several times in my blog over the years, and use the approach myself with great success. BUT this approach requires some foundation skills for both the clinician AND the person living with pain.

Before I delve into the skills I think clinicians and people living with pain need, let me outline the treatment and it’s rationale.

The basis for this treatment is the idea that if pain is going to be present, and it no longer represents an indication of the state of the tissues, then avoiding movements is no longer necessary for tissue healing. At the same time, people generally don’t want to do things that flare pain up, and so they tend to avoid those movements. The issue is then much more about how to gradually get used to the fluctuations in pain (ie freak out less) while at the same time beginning to do things with the painful limb. Supporting this approach is some basic science that suggests the less we use an area of our body, the more distorted our brain’s representation of that area becomes.

So, after discussing basic information about pain and tissues, in pain exposure therapy, clinicians work together with the person living with pain to:

  • begin doing movements that are usually avoided
  • avoid responding to any behaviour that is usually associated with experiencing pain – things like grimacing, groaning, saying ouch, and rubbing the area
  • provide progressively more demanding input to the painful area despite changes in reported pain
  • encourage increased normal use of the area within daily life – eg holding onto bottles, cups, utensils, putting shoes and sox on, walking normally

In addition, clinicians use this type of therapy also prescribe many exercises to be carried out frequently through the day despite painful flareups. Sometimes clinicians will restrain the other unaffected limb so that the painful limb HAS to be used just to get things done.

Some of you reading this blog will be reminded of the work by Doidge in which a very similar approach is used during rehabilitation from stroke or traumatic brain injury – by using the limbs in a normal way, new neuronal pathways are developed, allowing the limb to eventually return to pretty much normal function.

Others of you will probably be saying “how cruel!” and “but Moseley and Butler say don’t do things that increase pain because – neurotags!”

Here’s my take on it.

Currently there exist very few, if any, randomised controlled trials of this approach for CRPS I. Actually, there are few RCTs for ANY form of CRPS and ANY treatment for CRPS.

This means we don’t have a great deal of evidence to go on when trying to decide the best approach for managing the functional problems experienced by people living with CRPS. We know that for some people mirror therapy is helpful, while there is less support for graded motor imagery (Bowering, O’Connel, Tabor, Catley et al, 2013).  We know there are very few pharmaceuticals that provide any pain reduction for people living with CRPS. There is “low quality evidence that bisphosphonates, calcitonin or a daily course of intravenous ketamine may be effective for pain when compared with placebo” (O’Connell, Benedict, McAuley, Marston et al, 2013), but otherwise very little else has been shown to have any effect at all either on pain intensity or function.

We do know that physiotherapy and occupational therapy focusing on function rather than pain reduction may have some longterm positive effects (O’Connell, Benedict, McAuley, Marston et al, 2013), and we also know that graded exposure treatments for other types of pain problem, especially low back pain, have been effective (studied since 2001).

BUT here’s the thing. Unless the person living with chronic pain is comfortable with the idea that this approach directly confronts their fear of painful flare-ups, it’s just not going to float. Both the clinician and the person living with pain need to understand the underlying principles of this approach – and have some skills to deal with the very likely distress that will emerge when pain inevitably flares up.

What we should also know is that this approach does not try to reduce pain – although for many people, according to one study (Barnhoorn, Oostendorp, van Dongen et al, 2012) pain does reduce. Yet for others, pain increases – but people can do more.

Where do I stand on this?

I think it’s worth a try but only if the person conducting the therapy is VERY comfortable with the underlying principles of graded exposure as it’s used for phobia. AND has skills to manage their own discomfort at seeing someone else experiencing high levels of distress. To me this means having had some additional training in graded exposure for phobia, and lots of practice at using mindfulness and other forms of maintaining empathy despite seeing another person being distressed. It’s not easy to be empathic without either losing your own cool – or “giving in” to the distress of the person – and that just undoes the therapy.

It also means the person participating in the therapy, ie the patient, must be completely on board with it, and not just the person but also his/her healthcare team AND family. AND have some skills to deal with distress that comes with exacerbations of pain. This approach is not for the faint-hearted, or for anyone who feels coerced into participating in the treatment without feeling very confident that they can maintain their involvement.

 

Barnhoorn, K. J., van de Meent, H., van Dongen, R. T. M., Klomp, F. P., Groenewoud, H., Samwel, H., . . . Staal, J. B. (2015). Pain exposure physical therapy (pept) compared to conventional treatment in complex regional pain syndrome type 1: A randomised controlled trial. BMJ Open, 5(12), e008283. doi:10.1136/bmjopen-2015-008283

Barnhoorn, K. J., Oostendorp, R. A., van Dongen, R. T., Klomp, F. P., Samwel, H., van der Wilt, G. J., . . . Frolke, J. P. (2012). The effectiveness and cost evaluation of pain exposure physical therapy and conventional therapy in patients with complex regional pain syndrome type 1. Rationale and design of a randomized controlled trial. BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders, 13, 58.

Barnhoorn, K. J., Staal, J. B., van Dongen, R. T., Frolke, J. P., Klomp, F. P., van de Meent, H., . . . Nijhuis-van der Sanden, M. W. (2014). Are pain-related fears mediators for reducing disability and pain in patients with complex regional pain syndrome type 1? An explorative analysis on pain exposure physical therapy. PLoS ONE [Electronic Resource], 10(4), e0123008

Bowering, K. J., O’Connell, N. E., Tabor, A., Catley, M. J., Leake, H. B., Moseley, G. L., & Stanton, T. R. (2013). The effects of graded motor imagery and its components on chronic pain: A systematic review and meta-analysis. Journal of Pain, 14(1), 3-13

Ek, J. W., van Gijn, J. C., Samwel, H., van Egmond, J., Klomp, F. P., & van Dongen, R. T. (2009). Pain exposure physical therapy may be a safe and effective treatment for longstanding complex regional pain syndrome type 1: A case series. Clinical Rehabilitation, 23(12), 1059-1066.

O’Connell Neil, E., Wand Benedict, M., McAuley, J., Marston, L., & Moseley, G. L. (2013). Interventions for treating pain and disability in adults with complex regional pain syndrome- an overview of systematic reviews. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, (4).

van de Meent, H., Oerlemans, M., Bruggeman, A., Klomp, F., van Dongen, R., Oostendorp, R., & Frolke, J. P. (2011). Safety of “pain exposure” physical therapy in patients with complex regional pain syndrome type 1. Pain, 152(6), 1431-1438.

a-different-point-of-view

Stigma and chronic pain


Stigma is about devaluing and discrediting behaviours made by people towards those who have or are “different” from the average Joe or Josie Bloggs. For people experiencing and living with chronic pain, stigma may occur because the “average” experience of pain is associated with actual or potential tissue damage (or described in these terms) and for most chronic pain the “issues in the tissues” are less than expected by people holding a biomedical viewpoint.  Add to this that most people in the world know about acute pain which settles as expected whereas chronic pain persists, seems “disproportionately” bad in comparison with what’s expected.

De Ruddere and Craig (in press) have reviewed the literature to understand what is known about stigma and chronic pain, and what can be done about it. I thought it an apt paper to include in this blog because almost every person with chronic pain has, at some point, said they don’t feel their pain is either being taken seriously, or is accepted as real, or feel like they’re not being believed. Of course, pain is not the only condition where self-report is the only thing that we can use to determine the experience – depression, anxiety, post-concussion syndrome, fatigue are among the common experiences that are not given the kind of acknowledgement that we give to fractures or appendicitis or asthma.

People living with chronic pain say their partners, family and friends don’t seem to believe them, and that health professionals think their pain is exaggerated, imagined. They feel they’re being told it’s their fault, to “pull yourself together”, just “harden up” and often feel they’re being told to go away because they don’t have a real problem. Whether this is in fact the case undoubtedly depends on the persons involved – but it’s a common story and one I’ve heard in my clinical experience over and over and over again.

I guess some of the worst things I hear about stigma is that experienced by people seeking help for their pain from health professionals. If things don’t seem to add up, in the eyes of the observer, then people experiencing chronic pain can get less sympathy, are disliked, thought of as less meriting help, and often suspected of simply wanting attention.

The effect of this kind of behaviour from those charged with the duty to care is on distress and disability. People who feel misunderstood or maligned by treatment providers may receive less care and as a result, are able to do less, and feel rejected – social rejection and chronic pain share some similar neurobiological pathways (Eisenberger, 2012). Additionally, because the people experiencing the pain probably also hold similar beliefs to those who reject them (because the most common beliefs about pain are that there’s something going on in the tissues, and pain should fit with that tissue damage), they begin to doubt themselves, question their own responses, wonder if they really are as badly off as they feel. I know I felt this during my recovery from mild traumatic brain injury, when I wondered if I was actually just wanting a break from having to do things – yet at the same time I couldn’t doubt the performance deficits I experienced every day, and the need to sleep for several hours a day because otherwise I just could not function.

De Ruddere and Craig posit some reasons for other people stigmatising those living with chronic pain. One is that with acute pain, behavioural responses are often involuntary, automatic responses such as reflex withdrawal, vocalisations (groaning), or facial expressions. These elicit a primitive caring response in most people. Yet with chronic pain, many of the responses are less reflexive, and more voluntary – such as withdrawing from doing things or describing pain. These are usually thought to indicate that we’ve thought about them, and we’re doing them on purpose or deliberately.  When these behaviours take place alongside the general belief that pain “should” be acute and related to tissue damage, not showing automatic pain behaviours begins to look kinda fishy.

In evolutionary biology, altruistic behaviour towards others is based on an underlying assumption that if we do to others, they will do to us in turn. A sort of reciprocity. When people don’t look like they’re genuinely in pain (ie their behaviours aren’t the same as those carried out with acute pain), suspicions rise – “Are you really hurt, or are you wanting to get something for nothing?”

De Ruddere and Craig suggest some other theoretical explanations for the high level of suspicion applied to people with chronic pain, but I think this evolutionary one is an especially challenging one to deal with. Most treatment approaches attempt to upskill people living with pain to be able to communicate their problems effectively, and to reduce the frequency and interference of pain behaviour. This is only half the answer. We need to continue giving healthcare providers a deep understanding of a biopsychosocial approach: that pain is ALWAYS involves biological processes, psychological processes and is set within a social context, so that healthcare delivery goes well beyond assuming that “if the pain is gone the person is back to normal”.

Get this paper once it comes out in print. I think it’s time the social aspects of our pain management treatments were given more airtime, and this paper provides some exciting direction for future research and clinical practice.

 

 

 

De Ruddere L & Craig KD. (2012). Understanding stigma and chronic pain: a state of the art review. Pain.

Eisenberger NI. The pain of social disconnection: examining the shared neural underpinnings of physical and social pain. Nature Reviews Neuroscience 2012;13(6):421-434.DOI: 10.1038/nrn3231